An interview with the hip-hop hedonist Tairy Hesticles.

Tairy Hesticles, aka William Hinrichsen has been a quiet force, dominating the world of underground hip-hop via youtube. Not only does he have a hand in creating lyrically deep and smooth music, he plucks the even deeper underground unknown nuggets of rap gold from the mines that are the internet and shares them with hip-hop heads across the nation. If you’re a fan of the raw, realistic, emotional and passionate subgrene of hip-hop there’s guranteed to be something for you within his prolific youtube channel. While writing this, there are currently 1,988 uploaded videos on his page and I’d be willing to bet he’ll hit 2,000 before the week is over. Within those videos are a few of his own, you’ll notice they’re some of the higher viewed videos which is a testament to his musical capabilites. Tairy Hesticles himself provides a deep, self-depreciating, emotion filled side of his inner-workings towards his newest project which is due out this August. This is the interview with Tairy Hesticles, the hip-hop hedonist and the man who knows more about rap music than your local record store clerk.

UG:  So you’ve got this pretty cool alias, Tairy Hesticles aka Uncle Tairy. When and how did these come about?:

TH: When I was 18 I was living in an appartment at the Heartland Ridge, right across from the college I was attending.  I lived in an upstairs unit, and a guy we called Beigman lived below me.  Beigman was a funny dude and had an X-Box live account named TairyHesticles.  He got booted from this account and ended up using the name JesusEatsBabies, which never got deleted.  JesusEatsBabies being a more acceptable name to Microsoft was supposed to be the funny part of the story, but I laughed harder at the name TairyHesticles because I have the sense of humor of a farting 12 year old.  When I started my Youtube page I couldn’t think of an interesting name, so I just went with TairyHesticles.

I had a similar loss for creativity when I started making music last year.  I tried to make music when I was 15 or 16 and I went by the name Kinetix on an old website called HHS…and that’s just fucking stupid.  I knew I needed a name that incorporated the Tairy page, so I chose Uncle Tairy.  People had posted some comments calling me Uncle Tairy on some MF DOOM videos and it just stuck with me.  I liked the idea of being this creepy, old uncle to a group of misfit hip hop fans.  I’m a strange guy, so it fit me.

UG:  Being from Minnesota, I stay pretty engulfed in the hip-hop scene here but haven’t been able to see much other cities have to offer for local music. How’s the scene down in San Antonio, TX?

TH: I’m actually from a tiny, working class town in Illinois called Minonk.  I’ve only been in San Antonio since May 10th and I’ll be leaving to the Great Lakes as soon as my Hospital Corpsman training with the Navy is finished.  I don’t know much about the scene here, but I did get to see Sage Francis and B. Dolan on my birthday, which was incredible because, come on, its Sage Francis.  Also, he knew about the TairyHesticles page, which was surreal to me.  That’s about all I know of the music scene.  Well, that and old smooth shit from UGK, 8 Ball & MJG, Swisha House, etc…

Peoria, IL and Chicago both have vibrant music scenes though.  Minonk is about 45 minutes from Peoria and that’s where I met Blaise B.  I think he’s responsible for a lot of the dope stuff going on around Peoria.  There’s a lot of good hip hop there and a ton of good dubstep.  I’m not a big fan of dubstep, but Peoria has been a haven for that dirty, unfiltered dub for years.  Chicago is pretty self-explanatory.  There’s bound to be a lot of thoughtful musicians in an area so rich with history and culture.

UG:  I’ve been following your youtube channel for a couple years now, and you consistently post great new underground hip-hop frequently (almost 2,000 videos worth of songs), a majority of which this hip-hop head had never heard of before then. How do you find this music? Do you know these dudes?

TH: Almost everything up until late 2009 was music taken right from my collection of CD’s.  Like I said before, I lived in a very small town and most of the fun I had consisted of getting high and finding new music.  Once I ran out of CD’s to post, I started searching online.  As generic as it is, a ton of the new music I’d check out would be from Listmania on Amazon.com.  I’d look up a CD I knew I liked and then poke around at albums that were similar.  Last.fm helped a lot with finding new music as well.  The vast majority of music I posted before 2011 were from people that I had no contact with.  When I met DKat and Airospace I started changing the philosophy of the page from posting underground hip hop that, while obscure to the mainstream, had made their rounds through the internet to more of a promotional tool for those that had just started their musical careers or had little help getting their music out.  Right now I’m trying to blend the two together, but the page is still much more of a haven for up and coming artists than a place to find music you can buy in stores.

UG:  As a fellow hip-hop connoisseur, what are your top 5 favorite hip-hop albums of all time?

TH: That’s a question I’ve been frequently asked and I can only answer for my favorite album.  Hands down, First Born by Eyedea & Abilities is the best CD I’ve ever heard.  Its just so lyrically groundbreaking.  I remember first hearing that CD when I was 18, which was an exciting time in my life as far as musical discovery is concerned.  I bought First Born along with Godlovesugly and I was so blown away with the way Micheal could put together thoughts.  This CD alone pushed me into an obsession with hip hop and also kick started the beginning of writing thoughtful poetry.  Before that I was writing more structured songs with a predictable pace and basic hook, just tinkering with punch lines and still trying to find ways to get my thoughts onto paper.  After hearing First Born my writing process started to click.  I can’t put an order to my other top five favorites but they are probably Madvillainy, El-P’s Fantastic Damage, Cannibal Ox’s The Cold Vein and Eyedea’s Oliver Hart album.  There are so many more that are right up there though, including Aesop Rock’s Labor Days, Sage Francis’ A Healthy Distrust, The Roots’ Illdelph Halflife, Dr. Octagonecologyst, Deltron 3030, Souls of Mischief’s ’93 Til Infinity, A Tribe Called Quest’s Midnight Mauraders, Nas’ Illmatic, Kool Keith/Motion Man/Kutmasta Kurt’s Masters of Illusion, Binary Star’s Masters of the Universe, Ghostface Killah’s Supreme Clientelle, Atmosphere’s Lucy Ford, Mr. Lif’s I Phantom, Bone Thugs-N-Harmony’s E.1999 Eternal, Canibus’ Rip the Jacker, Del the Funkee Homosapien’s Both Sides of the Brain, Group Home’s Livin’ Proof, Wuf Tix’s Scumbag Delerium….there are just so many amazing albums I’ve had the pleasure of listening to.

UG: Your lyrics are intricate and woven finely. You’ve got an honesty about yourself that most artists would be afraid to show. You definitely need more recognition. When did you start writing and rapping?

TH: I’ve been writing for as long as I can remember.  My grandma was a great writer and she passed it on to my dad, who got me into creative writing at a very young age.  I remember writing this awful song in fifth grade, the chorus was something like “I just wanna be with you today, tomorrow, tonight and I just wish for once everything would be alright” and my dad found it in the printer.  He was surprised at how I could structure a song with bridges and hooks and everything, but the track was so depressing for a fifth grader to write.  He wasn’t quite sure what to think, but he encouraged my writing even more after that and its just something that stuck with me.  I briefly tried making rap music when I was 15 with this cheap little handheld beat maker.  My best friend Froelich and I went by the name Coconut Joe’s and wrote almost exclusively about weed, the government, and how unfair it is that the government won’t just legalize weed.  I ended up giving that beat maker to a buddy of mine that left town and didn’t try making music again until DKat invited me to his place in Indiana.  We made a track called Tame the Time and I’ve been addicted ever since.

UG: What music influenced you most in growing up as a kid?

TH: For anyone that’s heard even a snippet of any of my songs, this is going to sound ridiculous, but up until about 5th grade I listened to only Christian music.  Not necessarily by choice, but that’s all my mom would buy me.  DC Talk and Jars of Clay I remember most of all.  My dad was working third shift and wasn’t home much, but he’d have us listen to classics like Bob Dylan and the Doobie Brothers.  In middle school I listened to a lot of pop/punk music like Blink 182 and Sum-41.  If you would have met me during my childhood you would have thought I’d be more likely to be a pastor than an emcee.  The Kottonmouth Kings were the first group that really got me into anything hip hop and I didn’t start listening to them until I was 15.

On a quick side note, its a real shame that the 1995 self-titled Jars of Clay CD was only marketed to Christians.  That’s probably the only Christian album that I could still throw in and vibe to.  Its a pretty beautiful album until you realize that the love songs are all about a guy that’s been dead for two thousand years. 

UG:  How did the project DRYTUNCL with you and DRTYDRDZ begin?

TH: Pretty much the same way that every good thing that has happened to me over the last year did:  The Tairy page.  Right around when I started making music with Ponce under the Cuple Powks name DRTY sent me a comment to check out his page.  I very rarely check my comments on the page and most of the time when someone says “check out my page” it usually means “come listen to my terrible music”.  I checked out his page though and really like what he was doing, especially on a beat he had called Spasmo.  I never ended up using that beat, but I made Rusty Chain to one of his beats.  He sent me more beats shortly after that and I connected with almost every one of them.  There are good beats and then there are beats that grab you at your innermost core and make you need to write to them.  Almost every one of his beats hit me like that, so I did more work with his beats and by the time I left for boot camp in January I was working almost exclusively to his production.  After I got out of boot camp he had a full three albums worth of new beats and the next logical step seemed to be to make an album together. 

UG:  The tracks you’ve released for the DRYTUNCL album Dextromethorphan and Dog Tags are amazing so far, can’t wait for the full thing. You recently announced that you’d be sending free physical copies to those who want them. That’s one of the coolest things I’ve seen an artist do to market themselves in a long time. I know you made a video about this, but for interviews sake why did you decide to do this?

TH: The best thing to happen in my life has been discovering recording.  The second best thing to happen in my life has been talking to the people that listen and give feedback to the music that I record.  For this reason I want to do something for everyone that have not only been listening to my music, but also those who have been supporters of the Tairy page itself.  Its not for marketing purposes, its strictly because I want to show my gratitude in any way that I can.  The best part about finding out that I can rap this comparatively late to most emcees is that I already have somewhat of an established life and income outside of music, even if I am pretty broke and my life is a hilarious mess.  I plan on attending graduate school for my MBA at my first duty station and the Navy pays me well enough to live, so I don’t have to worry about eating off my music, which allows me to do literally whatever I want to with it.  If I want to put out an entire song based around Chris Benoit putting the Crippler Crossface on his underdeveloped son before murdering his family, I can, and the people that listen to the Tairy page are so cool that they would probably listen and laugh right along with me…as long as it wasn’t autotuned.

UG:  If you could do an album full of dream collaborations who would you work with and why?

TH: Great question.  Blaise B. has been my mentor in hip hop since far before I actually started recording and I’ve always wanted to do a CD with him, which we just may do now that we’ll be in the same area.  Edan would be great to work with, although I get the feeling that he procrastinates a bit too much for me.  I could use a perfectionist though, as I tend to just pump out tracks an hour after making them.  Slug and I could make some pretty great self-deprecating material together.  Sage Francis tears shit on any track he makes, so that would be amazing.  Canibus, but I’m certain he would make me look like a simpleton.  I always wanted to get on an Algorythms track.  Aesop Rock for obvious reasons.  A pure hip hop track with One-Be-Lo would be incredible.  I think a track with Too Short would be one of the funniest things music has seen.  Me shitting on myself for 2 minutes and Too Short being a confident pussy magnet doing what he does.  I think Tyler the Creator and I could make one hell of an offensive track.  Ces Cru.  Type.  DJ Abilities.  Black Thought.  Kool Keith.  There are more.

UG:  Who are some of the favorite people you’ve worked with and why?

TH: As far as making music, I’ve only worked with Blaise B., DRTYDRDZ, DJ Ellis (my buddy Ponce) and DJ [Sum] Asshole (my friend Anthony).  My guy Punx in MN gave me some contact info to Ces Cru though, and I really enjoyed talking to them.  They really appreciate their fans.

 

UG:  How can all the fans stay updated with your new music and announcements?

TH: I’m constantly updating my Youtube page, so any new music and announcements I have will be posted up there.  Once I get this album finished I’ll post links up on the page as well.  I want to start a legitimate webpage in the future where you can download/purchase my music as well as others like JayKubes, Samuri Outlaw, DKat and others.  The best way to get ahold of me is to e-mail me at tairyhesticles88@yahoo.com.  I’m always looking for new music to post on the page as well, so if you’re reading this and want to introduce your music to the weirdos on the TairyHesticles page, send something to my inbox. 

UG:  What is one piece of advice you have for the kids trying to breakout into the underground music scene?

TH: I haven’t really broken out anywhere myself, so I don’t feel comfortable giving anyone advice about how to do that; however, I do have some advice for any of the kids looking to start or just starting out making hip hop music.  I would tell them to make what they feel inside and not emulate anyone else, regardless of how indie or underground they may be.  I know that this is much easier said than done, since everyone making music is influence by the others that came before them, but if you can get your actual feelings onto the page and make music for your own sanity, its so much more satisfying than framing your music around something you’ve heard.  It may come out odd, sensitive, angry, or even confident if that’s what’s really inside of you, but at the end of the day if you do gain some recognition you’re going to have to live the music you’ve been making.

And if all else fails, grow a complete disdain for everyone else and masturbate a lot…that seems to have worked for me so far.

Carnage’s Dedication to Eyedea

Carnage The Executioner made a music video for his re-creation of the song “Star Destroyer” from the classic Eyedea & Abilities album “E&A“. The original version featured Carnage on the second verse. This song and video were recorded and created over a 4-day period in November 2011 both in dedication to the late, great Hip-Hop icon Micheal Larsen (Eyedea), and in celebration of his birthday (hence the amended title “Heaven’s Gate 11-9-11”).  The entire song was re-created by Carnage The Executioner: All lyrics and vocal scratches were performed by Carnage. The music/beat was entirely beat boxed – the only instruments used were a tambourine and woodblocks.